A People- and Animal-Friendly Summer at the Museum

Friendly Smiles Start at the Coat Check

Red rubber bouncy animals that resemble horses on a gray shelf behind empty wheeled containers

Friendly coat-check dwellers; Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Johannes Rinke

Our colleague Johannes Rinke in Visitor Services just sent us this funny snapshot taken in the Jewish Museum Berlin group coat check. When we asked, filled with curiosity, what the friendly creatures were doing there, we learned that these rubber animals are available for children to play with during the Cultural Summer events in the garden.

“For many years, here at the museum we only had one sorry example of this species, and it had to fritter away most of the year alone in the dark basement, until it could be enthusiastically grabbed at by hundreds of children’s hands at the Cultural Summer events,” explained Carolin Kiel in our Events department.  continue reading


Action Reconciliation International Youth Summer Camp in Osnabrück at the Augustaschacht Memorial

From 3 to 7 July 2017, young people from various European countries will assist in excavation work at the memorial premises and search for artifacts there. “Members of the international summer camp group can engage in international exchange during hands-on activities at the memorial,” explains Christine Bischatka, coordinator of the Action Reconciliation Service for Peace international summer camp.  continue reading

Posted in Beyond our own back yard
Tagged by ,


Exhibition Tip: Shalom. 3 Photographers Look at Germany

Readers of our blog may be interested to learn that from 5 May to 3 September, the Museum in the Kulturbrauerei is hosting the exhibition Shalom. 3 Photographers Look at Germany. Holger Biermann | Rafael Herlich | Benyamin Reich. Here is a snippet from the exhibition announcement:

A kosher food store in Berlin, a rabbi’s family with a new-born, police officers standing guard at a Frankfurt synagogue – scenes from everyday Jewish life in Germany. These photographs by Holger Biermann, Rafael Herlich and Benyamin Reich from 2000 to 2015 document Jewish life and culture from different perspectives – not only showing children in a Talmud School or practicing Jews celebrating Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, but also anti- Semitic graffiti daubed on a synagogue.

The exhibition encourages visitors to engage with the question: How far is Jewish life taken for granted as a normal part of German society 70 years after the Shoah?

Opening times: Tues-Sun 10 am–6 pm, Thurs 10 am–8 pm
Free admission

More information, on supplementary offerings for example, can be found on the website of the Museum in the Kulturbrauerei (in German).