Jewrovision 2018

Saturday, 10th of February, in Dresden, with livestream!

The motto of this year’s Jewrovision is THE CIRCLE OF LIFE. More than 60 groups with a total of 1200 members from all over Germany will participate. The jury consists of Daniel Donskoy, Susan Sideropolous, Ben Salomo, and Aaron Altaras.

 Logo: Jewrovision Dresden 2018: The Circle of LifeImportant information about the event at Messe Dresden (Hall 1) – including information on ticket reservations and directions – can be found on the Jewrovision website (in German).

In case you cannot be there in person (unlike our program director): The livestream starts at 8.30 pm.

About Jewrovision

Based on the idea of the Eurovision Song Contest, Jewrovision is not only the largest Jewish singing and dancing competition in Germany, but also in Europe. The first Jewrovision took place in 2002 in Bad Sobernheim. This year, for the first time, the competition takes place in one of the new federal states of Germany. All Jewish children and young people aged ten to nineteen from Germany can participate. Their local Jewish community’s youth center registers them.


Obituary for Coco Schumann

14 May 1924–28 January 2018

Coco Schumann at the multimedia Rafael Roth Learning Center in 2002; Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jo Diener

The Jewish Museum Berlin grieves the loss of Coco Schumann. The guitarist and jazz musician passed away last Sunday at the age of ninety-three years old. Coco Schumann frequently performed as part of the Cultural Summer program, and his relationship with the Jewish Museum Berlin reaches back to its founding. For a long time, Coco Schumann’s life story could be retraced in the Rafael Roth Learning Center. It exposed museum visitors to a childhood cut short by National Socialist oppression—and a musical talent that granted young Schumann moments of self-assertion in the Berlin jazz clubs ostracized by the Nazis. This talent would also save his life in Theresienstadt and Auschwitz.

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A New Beginning

The fourth episode in our blog series “Memories from the Life of Walter Frankenstein”

Black and white photograph. Walter Frankenstein sits on a chair, bent forward, his elbows supported on his thighs.

Walter Frankenstein during his time in the kibbutz, Greifenberg, around December 1945–May 1946; Jewish Museum Berlin, gift of Leonie and Walter Frankenstein

What were they to do now? Nothing was left of the Frankensteins’ old life. Their relatives and friends had been murdered, including Walter and Leonie’s mothers. All of Europe lay in ruins.

The first step in the Frankensteins’ new life was a simple administrative act: they registered with the Jewish Community of Berlin and were assigned an apartment. However, due to the bad supply situation, they were advised to leave Berlin as soon as possible. Nevertheless, they decided to spend the summer in Berlin. Walter volunteered as a manager for the Neukölln Leisure Games. At the same time, he made contact with the Jewish Brigade. Over the course of the war, the British Mandate government had drastically reduced the channels for legally entering Palestine. That meant that for the roughly 250,000 displaced persons ( DPs) in camps in western Europe, illegal entry was often the only way to reach Palestine. Walter managed to arrange an opportunity for legal emigration for Leonie and the children through the members of the Jewish Brigade. In return, he promised to smuggle young Jews southward through Germany for the Brigade. Their destinations were harbors on the Mediterranean where underground Jewish organizations prepared ships for their illegal entry into Palestine.

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