Failed Emigration

From Our Holdings

Shortly before being deported on 6 July 1942, Frieder Neuber gave this leather pouch to her niece Gerda Maison. The pouch contains drafts of letters by Frieda as well as letters and telegrams sent to her over a period of nearly three years.

Vain Efforts to Emigrate

Most of them consist of correspondence between herself and Bob Kunzig, a young American law student. They had met during Frieda Neuber's three-year stay in Philadelphia. Bob tried to arrange the emigration of his Aunt Frieda to the US with money he had inherited from his grandmother. He obtained an affidavit and passage on a ship, and urged her to speak personally to the American Consulate. But Frieder Neuber was assigned such a high number on the waiting list for emigration to the US that she could not have emigrated for years. She was deported to Theresienstadt where she was killed along with her siblings Clara and Hermann.

Deported despite Baptism

Only Frieda's brother Robert Maison, Gerda's father, survived thanks to his non-Jewish wife. It didn't help in the least that all four siblings had been baptized at the St. Jacobi Protestant Church in Berlin on 12 October 1882. More than fifty years later, they were classified by the Nuremberg Race Laws as Volljuden (full-blood Jews). They were exposed, without recourse, to the Nazis' persecution. In her letters, Frieda Neuber describes her arduous daily life in Berlin – in a tone shifting between hope and deep disheartenment.

Exceptional Documents

Gerda Maison gave the leather pouch to the Jewish Museum Berlin sixty-five years after her aunt's deportation. Many of the family collections in our archive contain letters or messages from those who remained in Germany to their emigrated relatives. In very few cases, however, have the letters of both correspondents survived. In an interview from 30 October 2007, Gerda Maison, then 88, talked about what she lived through as a young woman. You can listen to audio clips from the interview here.

(9) Selected Objects from the Material Culture Collection Alle anzeigen

Selected Objects from the Material Culture Collection

Flag with the Star of David

In 1935, Martin Friedländer hung a blue and white flag from his window, making a confident statement against the racist Nuremberg Laws.

Frieda Neuber's Leather Pouch

Shortly before being deported to Theresienstadt, Frieder Neuber gave this leather pouch to her niece. The letters inside it document her desperate attempts to leave the country.

Memmelsdorf Genizah

In February 2002, workers renovating a house discovered a burlap sack filled with papers and personal items when they opened up a section of the ceiling. The house had been owned by Jews from 1775 to 1939.

Model of the Cargo Steamer Max

The Hamburg shipowner Arnold Bernstein received this model of his first ship in 1929 as a gift for his company's tenth anniversary. Eight years later, his career ended abruptly. He was detained and only managed to escape Germany at the last minute.

Max Haller's Collection of Medals

Max Haller fought in the First World War for the Imperial German Navy. When SA members threatened him during the April Boycott of 1933, he pointedly placed a velvet cushion with his military distinctions in the shop window.

Dr. Oscar Hirschberg's Office Signs

A total of seven office signs used by Dr. Oscar Hirschberg document both his career as a practicing physician and the political changes and antisemitic exclusion during the period of Nazi rule.

The Sommerfelds’ Thirty-One Keys

Thirty-one keys – that's all that remains of the luggage the Sommerfeld family took with them when they emigrated from Berlin. They only managed to leave for England at the very last minute – just before the Second World War broke out.

Challenge Trophy from the Oberspree Jewish Rowing Club

The member of the Oberspree Jewish rowing club who logged the most kilometers in the water over the course of a year was awarded a challenge trophy. Fred Eisenberg won the award three years in a row.

Stamping Hammer, Invented by Gustav Maletzki

This stamping hammer, made around 1930, is one of the patented inventions for which the apparel furrier earned several awards. In 1938, Gustav Maletzki was forced to escape Germany and brought the hammer to exile in Bolivia.

(9) Selected Objects from the Archive Alle anzeigen

Selected Objects from the Archive

Adoption contract Gloeden and Loevy

Even a Jewish-sounding name could be cause for discrimination. So the siblings Erich and Ursula Loevy chose to be adopted by Bernhard Gloeden, a grammar school teacher and family friend.

A desperate letter to their son in Sweden

"As long as we are still here, we will write to you every third day," wrote Paul and Sophie Berliner to their son, Gert, who was living in Stockholm, on 6 November 1941.

Martin Riesenburger’s Service Card

A provisional document from February 1953 certified that Martin Riesenburger was a rabbi responsible for pastoral care in East Berlin prisons.

Index cards from the British Army

Thousands of German emigrants fought against Germany in the British Army during the Second World War. In case of capture, they had to change their names, as these index cards document.

Frieda Neuber's Leather Pouch

Shortly before being deported to Theresienstadt, Frieder Neuber gave this leather pouch to her niece. The letters inside it document her desperate attempts to leave the country.

Memmelsdorf Genizah

In February 2002, workers renovating a house discovered a burlap sack filled with papers and personal items when they opened up a section of the ceiling. The house had been owned by Jews from 1775 to 1939.

Red Cross Letter to Emmy Warschauer

After the outbreak of the Second World War, the aid organization’s message service gave emigrants a way to contact relatives in Germany. That’s how Emmy Warschauer received confirmation that her daughter was alive.

Letter of Protection for the Jews of Ichenhausen

Until the nineteenth century, the residence and trading rights of Jews in the German territories were defined in letters of protection (Schutzbriefe), which had to be purchased.

Journeyman’s Book Belonging to the Shoemaker Leopold Willstätter

Leopold Willstätter traveled around southwest Germany and France as a journeyman from 1836 to 1843. The journeyman's book with a precise description of him also served as a form of identification.

Shoah

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Emigration/Exile

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