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The Installations

Menashe Kadishman, Via Lewandowsky, Arnold Dreyblatt, and the Art Vending Machine


Shalekhet - Fallen Leaves

Menashe Kadishman's contribution to the Jewish Museum Berlin is the installation titled Shalekhet (Fallen Leaves) in the Memory Void, one of the empty spaces of the Libeskind Building. Over 10,000 open-mouthed faces coarsely cut from heavy, circular iron plates cover the floor.

Kadishman's installation, on loan from Dieter and Si Rosenkranz, powerfully compliments the spatial feel of the Voids. While these serve as an architectural expression of the irretrievable loss of the Jews murdered in Europe, Menashe Kadishman's sculptures filling them evoke painful recollections of the innocent victims of yesterday, today, and tomorrow.

Menashe Kadishman (*1932)
Gallery of the Missing
Photo of Via Lewandowsky

Via Lewandowsky
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Hans Grunert

Via Lewandowsky's "Gallery of the Missing" reminds visitors of the idea and character of "that which no longer exists". With this project, the artist refers symbolically to what has been lost, but can still be represented, a concept which Daniel Libeskind incorporated in his architecture, called "Voids". Five of them "interrupt" the Libeskind Building across a straight axis.

Black glass sculptures are installed on the exhibition floors in correlation with particular architectural "negative" spaces. The showcases, which visitors cannot look into, contain acoustic descriptions of missing objects. With the help of various soundbites, missing objects will be presented to the visitor's inner eye.

Via Lewandowsky (*1963)
Unsaid
Photo of Arnold Dreyblatt

Arnold Dreyblatt infront of his installation "Unsaid".
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Sönke Tollkühn

Excerpts from letters, diaries, and reports stemming from before deportation and from the ghettos and camps, but also notices from the authorities organizing the mass murders, appear and disappear in the installation entitled ”Unsaid” by the artist Arnold Dreyblatt. Since November 2008, this work has been on show in the permanent exhibition by the wall displaying photos of the Allies in front of the liberated concentration camps.

Arnold Dreyblatt (*1953)
Art Vending Machine in the Permanent Exhibition
'Art Vending Machine' after the design by Hanno Dannenfeldt

'Art Vending Machine' after the design by Hanno Dannenfeldt
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe

Art installation by Anna Adam featuring golden Hebrew letters on red velvet and a doll looking through binoculars where Stars of David can be seen.

In her satirical series "Feinkost Adam ©" German artist Anna Adam takes a tongue in cheek look at stereotypes and prejudices against Jews.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe

Back of a printed folded card by the artist Anna Adam

Anna Adam's playful folded cards make fun of not only common stereotypes against Jews, which she encounters time and again as a Jew born in Germany after the Holocaust – they also invite their new owner to complete the making of the card.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe

A CD-ROM next to an empty yellow CD case entitled "MIX Tape"

Musician, Choreographer, Teacher, and Performer Howard Katz has created a kind of time capsule with his "MIX Tape" from the first series for the art vending machine. All the songs on this mix tape are from specific crazy adventures and times in his life.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe

A DVD next to an empty green DVD case

The second series by Howard Katz entitled "4 Short Films" brings together four of the artist’s short films recorded on his phone that provide a glimpse into his brain, as he describes it.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Oliver Stratz

Three brown and beige sparrows made from acrylic resin and mineral powder

For their "sparrows" series, the twins Maria and Natalia Petschatnikov created 200 Sparrow reliefs from acrylic resin which they painted individually in various shades of brown. Sparrows, like other city birds, are a common view in big cities and are home around the world.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe

Oil painting showing coins totaling four euros in value

The second series created by Maria and Natalia Petschatnikov for the "art vending machine" at the Jewish Museum Berlin seems ironic. Entitled "4 euros," the native Russian twins painted 200 small-format oil paintings that show exactly what the title promises – coins worth 4 euros, sorted differently.
© photo: Maria & Natalia Petschatnikov

Abstract image with blue color traces on white canvas

The series "T’cheletfragmente" by Deborah S. Phillips is the result of the artist's intense research on the color blue. Phillips lives and works in Berlin – since the sky here is mostly gray, blue has taken on a very different meaning again.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe

Abstract image with blue color traces on white canvas

Deborah S. Phillips is currently working on a book with lithographs in different shades of blue. She has used the residues that arise from this for other projects including the "T'chelet ve Argaman" series – in the art vending machine, they take on their very own destiny.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Oliver Stratz

Abstract image with prominent black-blue pattern

The artist Georg Sadowicz takes us on a journey with his prominent offset print "The Mill" – the form rhythm portrayed goes beyond the usual spatial perspective and thus challenges the viewer's perception.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe

Abstract image with prominent black-red-blue pattern and a praying figure at the center

Also in his second series "The Cantor," Georg Sadowicz challenges the viewer – there are no clear planes or places of refuge in this print. In his works, the Polish artist does not intend to create a reflection of reality, but rather symbols of reality.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe

A young tattooed man lying on the floor, propped up on his right arm, looking with a lost expression out of the black-and-white photo

In her photo series "Third Generation," Hadas Tapouchi portrays young Jewish and Arab Israelis and Germans, all of whom have a double identity – on the one hand they belong to the third generation after the Second World War and on the other they are part of the "queer community."
© photo: Hadas Tapouchi

In this black-and-white photograph, two men with their arms around each other look in the camera.

In her photo series "Third Generation," the Israeli Hadas Tapouchi explores a possible link between war and sexuality.
© photo: Hadas Tapouchi

100 small oil drawings show a man pulling his face into grimaces with his hands

Daniel Wiesenfeld's wants to make the viewer laugh with his "Smile" series – the one hundred small-scale oil drawings are self-portraits showing the artist twisting his face into wild grimaces.
© photo: Detlef Baltrock

Chalk drawing showing interlaced human figures

Daniel Wiesenfeld's second series for the art vending machine are fragile charcoal sketches that leave an imprint on the side facing them which becomes the starting point for a new drawing.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe

Small cutouts of bowling balls with key chains

"Spares." Cut bowling balls. The artworks by Assaf Gruber can be used either as small key chains or as necklaces.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 2)

Black and white street view of a house

"Highway, Berlin, 2011." A Postcard from "In and Between the Cities." A Film by Daphna Westerman. The artist was intensively photographing her life through the cities she saw and the roads she traveled on, creating a (fictional) film that existed only through these postcards which she mailed to friends and fellow artists regularly. © Daphna Westerman (art vending machine round 2)

Etching of four persons on a balcony

The work "The Balcony" by David Moses is based on an etching by his grandfather who made his orginal print based on impressions of a trip to Berlin in 1963-64.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 2)

Human figure made of wire wrapped around rail track gravel

"Das Vermächtnis der Friede Traurig / The Legacy of Friede Traurig. It's never too late to have a happy childhood." Wire wrapped around rail track gravel. As "executrix," Deborah Wargon grapples with the treasures and dark mysteries of legacies.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 2)

Two colorful buttons hand-painted and inscribed with Hebrew letters

The main idea by artist Lina Khesina behind this object called "Tsemed Chemed – Fast Friends" is to show the beauty of the Hebrew language, to examine this beauty in playful ways and to transport it into everyday life – or, more specifically, to wear it.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 2)

Photo of a single, faraway and flowering tree in front of a stone wall and blue sky

"PHOTOMAT. Challenging WallMAT." Photoprint on aluminium Dibond. In a series of 10 images focusing on the rhythm of life of her home country Israel, the Israeli-German artist Ruthe Zuntz shows what is possible when divisions are dissolved.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 2)

Ink screen-printing on hand-burned velvet which shows two opposing skeletal fragments

"Essence." Ink screen-printing on hand-burned velvet by Victor Alaluf. The artwork seeks to express both the sense of destruction and that of rebirth, both death and life, structure and fragility.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 2)

Father and daughter on a couch

Photograph from the series "In Fathers’ Arms" by Mascha Danzis
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 1)

A candle in form of a root

In search of one’s roots – Alexis Hyman Wolff made a mould and beeswax casts of this find from her home, California.
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 1)

Processed Coca-Cola cans in Hebrew and Arabic

Processed Coca-Cola cans from Israel and Palestine by Andrei Krioukov, founder of the art form "disposable realism"
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 1)

"A letter to Deutsche Post, 2013, 27/80"

Conceptual art by Alex Martinis Roe on the reissue of the stamps "Hannah Arendt" and "Rahel Varnhagen"
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 1)

Paper mezuzah with pull-out comic strip

Paper mezuzah with pull-out comic strip by Zara Verity Morris
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 1)

Booklet "The Guardian / Sycamore Group"

Booklet with a text based on archival documents from the Kibbutz Hazorea (Israel) and illustrations by Atalya Laufer
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 1)

Film still: view of a room through a wall

Postcard with a film still from the movie "The Fourth Wall" by Daniel Laufer
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 1)

Postcard with a film still from the movie "The Fourth Wall" by Daniel Laufer
© Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe (art vending machine round 1)

Fragile charcoal drawings, entrancing prints, and playful installations – the "art vending machine" at the Jewish Museum Berlin has a wide range of surprising contemporary art hiding in its 30 compartments. The small-format unicums were created by international Jewish artists living in Berlin. All works of art were created exclusively for the art vending machine and are hand signed limited editions.

Since August 2013, visitors have been able to draw a piece of contemporary art from the machine – a redesigned and rebuilt vending machine from the 1970s – for 4 euros (payable in four one-euro or two two-euro coins).

In the current round (1 April 2015), nearly all of the participating artists have created two series for the machine – a total of 2,600 works will thus be available on the 1st level of the permanent exhibition in the coming months.

The following artists are involved in the project:
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