Why the Jewish Museum Berlin has every reason to finally open a children’s museum in 2019

A little story about a revolutionary kind of museum

Scetch of the ark

In the W. Michael Blumenthal Academy construction is currently underway on a Noah’s Ark-themed children’s museum; Jewish Museum Berlin, Olson Kundig Architecture and Exhibit Design, Seattle/WA, USA

 

“Do not touch!”—These three words are irrevocably associated with traditional museums. They denote an institutional balancing act. On the one hand, the historical objects and works of art that are gathered in museums are supposed to be made accessible to the public. On the other hand, the objects must be protected from the damage that might be done by overenthusiastic visitors. Despite what museologist Fiona Candlin describes as “low-key unauthorized touch”—stroking statues when unobserved, secretly tracing hieroglyphics with an index finger—a visit to a museum remains a mostly visual experience.  continue reading


“We’re no longer guests, we belong.”

An interview with Elena Bashkirova

The color photograph shows Elena Bashkirova in a black blazer and a violet patterned scarf. In the background is the Jerusalem exhibition.

Elena Bashkirova; Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jule Roehr

On 21 April 2018, the Glass Courtyard of the Jewish Museum Berlin will be opened for the seventh annual chamber music festival intonations, featuring Händel’s “Arrival of the Queen of Sheba.” Echoing our exhibition Welcome to Jerusalem, this year’s program features pieces that highlight the sanctity of Jerusalem. Elena Bashkirova, artistic director of the festival, took a tour of the exhibition then spoke with us about the “holy city,” the founding of intonations in Berlin, and the music that will be presented in the festival in the coming days:  continue reading


Obituary for Reinhard Rürup

27 May 1934 – 6 April 2018

Reinhard Rürup; Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Svea Pietschmann

 

The Jewish Museum Berlin mourns the loss of Reinhard Rürup. He died on Friday at age 83. Although as a historian his name is most associated with the Berlin Topography of Terror Foundation, the Jewish Museum Berlin also owes much to his work.

 

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