Jewish Places goes live today!

Starting now, you can fill this new website with content and life

Map with four historical photos cropped into circles

Landing page for the website Jewish Places

Jewish Places posts information about the local history of Jewish life in Germany on an interactive map, and invites users to contribute their own content. This sort of participation explores and permits a new kind of collecting, preserving, and sharing of knowledge about Jewish life.  continue reading


Jewrovision 2018

Saturday, 10th of February, in Dresden, with livestream!

The motto of this year’s Jewrovision is THE CIRCLE OF LIFE. More than 60 groups with a total of 1200 members from all over Germany will participate. The jury consists of Daniel Donskoy, Susan Sideropolous, Ben Salomo, and Aaron Altaras.

 Logo: Jewrovision Dresden 2018: The Circle of LifeImportant information about the event at Messe Dresden (Hall 1) – including information on ticket reservations and directions – can be found on the Jewrovision website (in German).

In case you cannot be there in person (unlike our program director): The livestream starts at 8.30 pm.

About Jewrovision

Based on the idea of the Eurovision Song Contest, Jewrovision is not only the largest Jewish singing and dancing competition in Germany, but also in Europe. The first Jewrovision took place in 2002 in Bad Sobernheim. This year, for the first time, the competition takes place in one of the new federal states of Germany. All Jewish children and young people aged ten to nineteen from Germany can participate. Their local Jewish community’s youth center registers them.


Quite Best Practice

On 8 November 2017, the German Federal Constitutional Court issued a delayed press release on a decision from 10 October 2017: the civil status law will have to allow a third gender by the end of 2018.

The media reacts with increased coverage on people who identify as intersexual or queer. For those who are queer, it’s difficult to find a place in a heteronormative world that only knows female or male, but nothing in between.

Tom Chai Sosnik’s story shows how queer people can find their place in society, and how not only they but everyone can benefit from it. Tom celebrated his coming out as transgender in spring 2015 with remarkable aplomb – in a ceremony performed by Rabbi Tsipi Gabai at a Jewish school in California, supported by his family.

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